Are you a lipreader?

31 05 2011

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Test yourself on this video clip – the transcript is next to the clip.

Meet Con Ingham, who speaks but says nothing ….. video after the jump.

You can book an expert lipreader at O’Malley Lipreaders.

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12 responses

31 05 2011
andy

He has got a Northern accent. Possibly Yorkshire. He says jawk for joke.

31 05 2011
deafa

Are british accent easier to lipread than American accent? Here we have northern/southern/western/boston /etc. Melting pot and I think it is hard to lipread.

31 05 2011
Tina

It depends on the lipreader and their personal experience. A lipreader used to lipreading American accents would likely find an American accent easier to lipread than an unfamiliar British accent. Plus, some English dialects are easier to lipread than others. Then you have the speaker – are they clear speakers or do they mumble?

31 05 2011
deafa

Most Americans where I live mumbles. I am profound deaf (oral only) since birth, wore HAs (and now CI) since three and I still find it hard to lipread some people. I can’t hear at all without HA/CI and lipreading without any sounds is too hard. I tried many times. I can’t lipread well without any sounds from my HAs/CI and sounds with my hearing aids/CI is too gibberish or distorted for me without lipreading.

BTW, when I think of lipreading, I think of people reading lips UNAIDED or without sounds. Is that what you mean by lipreading? To me, I just use the term “speechreading” because I use lipreading to assist my hearing aid/CI.

31 05 2011
Tina

Forensic lipreading is reading lips without any sound. Forensic lipreaders in the UK feel that ‘speechreading’ is a more accurate term but it is not as well known as ‘lipreading’. We look at the whole face don’t we, not just the lips, when reading speech in this way.

31 05 2011
deafa

yeah, that’s why I use speechreading. I use the whole package (facial expressions, lipreading, assisted sounds, body language) as much as I can to understand what the person is saying instead of focusing on the lips.

1 06 2011
CJ

Hi Tina,
I have been Deaf for 3 years at age 41 and have had 3 CI’s but due to a degenerated auditory nerve these no-longer provide percept or for that matter anything at all now. I have had 6 mths speech reading tuition and only got some of the clip first time. I’m soon to have an ABI in Europe and wonder if you know of any Non-tumor ABI recipients? Regards CJ

1 06 2011
Tina

Hi CJ- I know of one person who had it done, let me get back to you on this. Good luck!

1 06 2011
MM

I’m not an lip-reader, I’m more your ‘educated guess’ and ‘what the hell was that all about ?’, lol…

2 06 2011
CJ

Thanks Tina, I know of a few NF2 but I’m in the NT group. I have corresponded over the last 12 mths with 2 surgeons and a scientist and read lots of medical papers. I wouldn’t mind knowing of someones experience if they non-tumor ABI and don’t mind. You could just email me if you like. thanks.

3 06 2011
Cathy O

I usually have to “click” onto an accent first, and then I can lipread away. American and Canadian accents are what I do best, as I’m Canadian, but I can get some British ones, as long as they’re not too broad. Had no problem with the tape of Con and his Scotsman joke.

5 06 2011
deaflinguist

Hi Tina,

How did you truffle out this gem? British Pathe is fantastic – I’ve used it as a resource for the research in my own field as well, you’d be surprised what treasures it has. Lipreading silent movies is a fascinating thing and I wonder what people thought when they went to the silents all those years ago. It’s all the more fascinating for me now that I have had a CI because I keep expecting to hear sound – very strange.

Having run it and the other clip of the same man also on British Pathe I’ve noticed several things, so here’s my take on them:

First of all, I didn’t have any difficulty at all in following the joke . . .

Secondly, his visual cues were very interesting and demonstrate how much of a part body language cues play in lipreading. It was almost structured as a “how to lipread” course, especially taken in conjunction with the second film which ratchets up the difficulty a notch. The other film also tells a story twice over with a very distinct variation which an expert lipreader will spot!

Thirdly, I noticed two things about his speech. People from past generations speak differently (think of how they say the Queen sounds different from her younger self in terms of accent) and it’s quite noticeable with this gentleman – I haven’t quite analysed how but it may be something to do with silent movie/music hall/vaudeville traditions as it reminds me of the way people speak in silent films, so it may not be so much accent as mannerisms.

Also I’m convinced he is deaf himself. Even given the fact that the lip movements are necessarily exaggerated, and he’s performing on top of that, there are certain movements of lips, tongue and jaw that suggest to me that he might be deaf. He has a very particular way of pronouncing “n” and “t” in the middle of the words, suggesting that he is not used to voicing them totally.

I shall run away now – I’ve over-analysed it!!!!

Pidge

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