Bad lip reading jobs

29 03 2017

bad lip reading in chamonix

Do bad lip reading experiences exist?

I often get asked “What is forensic lip reading?”.

When a lip reader is lip reading, they are usually doing this in real life, face to face, watching a person’s lips, facial expressions, eyes, gestures, body language, and using context to clue themselves into the topic, so that they can understand another person. Many factors affect the lip readability of a person so the outcome is never a perfect translation. If enough of the factors affecting lip reading are present in a meaningful enough way, it all comes together beautifully to make sense to the skilled lip reader.

Forensic lip reading (or speech reading) is the simple transition of the skill of lip reading from real life to media, lip reading CCTV or video clips. Reading lips in 2D is much harder than reading lips in real life 3D because so many clues are missing. This makes for a bad lip reading experience for the lip reader. So many people assume, just because our lip readers can read lips, we can lip read anything you send us. We get so many videos that are #FAILs when we see them. So how can we make this a better experience for the lip reader?

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How accurate is AI lip reading? A deaf perspective

22 03 2017

lip reading lips

How accurate is lip reading – AI vs. Professionals

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies are again making a big splash in the news. This time with AI sinking its virtual teeth into lip reading. Researchers at the University of Oxford in the UK in collaboration with Google’s Deepmind has developed a system they claim can lip read more accurately than humans.

Lip reading has been one of the most prominent areas of research for the past decade. The main focus having been on overcoming the shortcomings in audio recognition in noisy environments.

Most recently, however, the focus is firmly planted on speech recognition algorithms and how such systems could help people who are deaf or hard of hearing have better access to television through accurate real-time subtitling.

I won’t lie to you when I first saw the news title ‘AI has beaten humans at lip reading’. I had to choke back a laugh.

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Communicating with deaf people using lipspeakers

17 03 2017

communicating with deaf people lipspeaker

Communicating with deaf people at conferences and workshops

To grow professionally and sharpen your skills you need to make an effort to explore new ways of working and learning. One of the best ways to do this to invest in yourself by frequently attending networking events and conferences. Effectively communicating with deaf people during such in-person seminars and workshops might seem difficult, but using a lipspeaker will provide equal opportunity.

Lipspeaking has been around since 1948, and a formal training programme was put in place in the 1960s. The Association of Lipspeakers is now celebrating its 20th anniversary.

A lipspeaker accompanies the deaf person, who can lipread, to an event and repeats what is said, enunciating clearly and without a voice, so the lipreader only needs to lipread one clear and trained speaker instead of several unclear speakers.

There is power in connecting with people who are active in your line of work and lipspeakers enable deaf people who lipread to share in that power.

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Who’s the best lipreader of all?

28 02 2015

mirror

Lipreading has become a rather commercial activity in the last few years. I’ve been asked to lipread celebrities at royal weddings, the Royals at royal weddings, babies and parents at royal christenings, criminals, sports people, and even the unsuspecting public.

I was born deaf and I have always been a lipreader. I am now totally deaf with 2 cochlear implants, yet I retain my lipreading skills. I am able to lipread most people I meet, lipread sideways, and even fool a lot of people into thinking I am a hearing person. I believe lipreading is not a science, it is an art. An art I have honed over many years, in many situations, in many different countries with various accents. My life experience of travelling around the world and “getting on with it” has served to make me a better lipreader. I can even lipread in Spanish, Japanese and Arabic.

There are days when my brain just “won’t compute” – I can be too tired for lipreading and the mental exercise inherent within, or my brain might just say “no”, or I may mentally get stuck and see a phrase which I know is not correct from the context of the language.

Forensic lipreading is even harder, as there is no sound at all, and often the screen view is very small. You are watching video footage over and over and over, sometimes a hundred times over, for perhaps a five second segment of footage, just to get that one word so that the whole sentence makes sense. You really can’t do this with a foreign language that you do not know.

Sometimes people tell me they are the best lipreader in the world. How do you think they are able to make that claim? Don’t you think it’s a bit presumptuous?

I’d love to hear what you think, please comment!





Are you a lipreader?

31 05 2011

Photobucket

Test yourself on this video clip – the transcript is next to the clip.

Meet Con Ingham, who speaks but says nothing ….. video after the jump.

You can book an expert lipreader at O’Malley Lipreaders.





Walks and talks for lip readers in London

13 06 2010

Actors, Oarsmen and Artists – Historic Hammersmith
Sunday 18th July 2010, 11.00am – 1.00pm

As these walks are now rather popular please book early to avoid disappointment as we are limiting the number of the group to 25 people.
Also be aware that we are starting the walk half an hour earlier than usual, at 11.00am.

*Meet outside Hammersmith tube exit from Piccadilly and District Line Tube on Hammersmith Broadway, next to the Benneton store*

We are looking forward to seeing you on what we are sure will be a very interesting look at an area with lots of history and excitement right up to the present day, with great views along the river and ending in a green and pleasant park.

Walk with Diane Burstein, London Blue Badge Guide

Passing Hammersmith by road or rail people often don’t realise that the River Thames flows through this area which holds some delightful secrets. Theatres, film locations, an elegant square, two churches, an exclusive school with some famous ex pupils and, of course, a riverside walkway with great views all feature. Hear of some actors, writers and artists past and present who have made Hammersmith their home. Learn the history of the famous Oxford v Cambridge boat race while passing the many sailing clubs which line this part of the river. Discover a bridge which is a great survivor and find out why some Hammersmith residents should have avoided the funeral of one of England’s most popular royals.

Lipspeaker & SSE provided for Diane’s walk.

Tickets £6.00 per person, payable in advance.

Advance booking essential. To book and to join the mailing list, leave a comment here and I will send you details.

FORWARD NOTICE:
On Wednesday, September 8th, 2010 we are offering a mid week walk for the first time. Legal London will take us into places that are not open to visitors at the weekends and for which we have asked permission to view. The booking form for this walk will be sent out at the beginning of July. The start time will be 10.45 am prompt at Temple Tube station. More details next month!




Walks & Talks for Lipreaders : Shoreditch & Hoxton, London

24 05 2009

theatre

Historic Shoreditch & Hoxton – London’s Creative Quarter : 11.30-1.30pm Sunday 5th July 2009

*Meet inside Old Street Tube Ticket Hall*

Walk with Diane Burstein, London Blue Badge Guide

Trace Shoreditch’s history from the days when it was London’s Theatreland (“Shakespeare in Love” was partly set in Shoreditch! ) to its current status as a centre for artistic creativity. England’s leading circus centre, a Victorian music hall, and a traditional street market all feature on this walk, which finishes at the Geffrye Museum, London’s museum of domestic interiors.

Lipspeaker & SSE provided.

Ticket price £6.00 per person, payable in advance. To book places please email LIPREADER @ YMAIL.COM with your name and address, and a booking form will be sent to you. The tickets and programme for the day will be sent out by return. Max. 2 tickets per lipreader.

Advance booking essential.