Deaf News – Living with hearing loss

1 04 2017

living with hearing loss

Good morning! We have a sunny morning here in London UK and I hope you’re starting to see spring appear where you are. There’s nothing like a bit of warm sunshine to lift our spirits. It’s time to put your feet up for this week’s read with a cuppa.

I came across a couple of interesting articles this week which I thought I’d share; A quick-start guide to understanding my hearing loss and The dark-and-dirty secret of people with hearing loss.

Did you know you can contact the emergency services without actually speaking to them? You just dial a number. I had no idea this service existed, find out more here.

I have read about ‘cures for hearing loss’ for the last 30 years. Another one has popped up, regenerating hair cells in the inner ear. I won’t be holding my breath!

My favourite article of the week was a gift from Jon Morrow: 7 life lessons from a guy who can’t move anything but his face.

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100,000 hits!

30 11 2010

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Readers, thank you for visiting and contributing to this blog! We reached 100,000 hits today. In doing so, we are creating a community for others who are following us in their journey to managing a hearing loss.

Coming up, we have *drum roll* …. hearing aid clinic issues, bilateral cochlear implantation, cochlear implants for Ménière’s disease, the art of communication, lip reading.

Are there any issues you would like to see featured?





Can you hear this?

22 06 2010

How good is your hearing? Tee hee. This one’s a damn sight more interesting than the RNID hearing test.

This link takes you to a simple hearing test. Can you hear this? I thought this is an interesting one to do with a new cochlear implant. The site has a list of tones that go from 8Hz to 22,000Hz. It’s usual for people over 25 to not be able to hear above 15kHz. What Hz can you hear up to, or can you hear all of them? I was able to hear all of them. Woo woo! I thought 19, 20 and 21 kHz sounded horrific – I could practically feel them. They all sounded similar after 8Khz as the implant is only capable of a maximum 9Khz stimulation, but I was certainly picking up the sampling.

It is known that listening to iPods at loud volumes for long periods of time can damage your hearing to a profound level and permanently. It’s nice that I don’t have to worry about that one anymore. As we age, we naturally lose our high frequency hearing gradually. This is why, sometimes, you walk in on your mother and she has the TV on full blast and asks you to speak up as she can’t hear you (or the TV). Then swears blind that she doesn’t have a hearing problem.

It can be difficult to differentiate between loudness levels with a cochlear implant. My perception of sounds are different as they are new and so seem much louder. Turning the pages of a book seems louder than a speaking voice.  A ticking clock seems as loud as chucking a book on a table. It’s hard work listening to all this over-stimulation! This test has a series of sine waves – can you hear which is louder? I was very happy to be able to get Q1 and Q3 correct.

Here’s a harder test. Can you tell the difference between two MP3 sound clips, one recorded at 320kbps and the other at 128kbps in this MP3 sound quality test? Nope, I couldn’t tell the difference either!

On the subject of music, there is a new site for research into cochlear implants and music appreciation – swing right on over to Hearing Organised Sound.

And finally, here’s something for you hearies (and interested deafies). I discovered a hearing loss simulation for a cochlear implant and a hearing aid. A bit of environmental sound, a bit of speech, a bit of music. To me, a new kid on the cochlear implant block, and very used to using hearing aids, they sound like pretty accurate simulations. What do you think?

Time to get back to the headphones and rock on!





Scientists explain the tinnitus and hearing loss link

5 10 2008

Scientists have explained for the first time how hearing loss can lead to tinnitus. Read on …